NOAA predicts severe hurricane season

2013 Atlantic hurricane season may have 3 major storms

May 24, 2013


The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has issued a forecast for an active or extremely active 2013 Atlantic hurricane season.

The numbers for 2013 are above the seasonal average of 12 named storms, six hurricanes, and three major hurricanes. Last year was the third-busiest storm season on record.

A year after Superstorm Sandy, residents along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts should prepare for “an extremely active” 2013 hurricane season, U.S. forecasters say.

NOAA has forecasted, with a 70 percent likelihood, 13 to 20 named storms of which seven to 11 could become hurricanes, including three to six major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5).

Those ranges are above normal for the six -month hurricane season, which officially begins June 1st. According to the National Hurricane Center, the seasonal average is 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes. Hurricane season ends Nov. 30.

Climate factors- including warmer-than-average water temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean contributed to 2013’s active forecast NOAA said.

NOAA also unveiled plas for a new “supercomputer” that will run and “upgraded Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting models.” That, combined with new Doppler technology from NOAA’s “hurricane hunter” aircraft, is expected to improved forecast accuracy by 10 to 15 percent,” NOAA said.

The severe forecast comes as many shoreline residents- particularly in New York and New Jersey- are still recovering from Sandy, which killed 147 people and caused more than $75 billion in damage in Octover 2012. It was the second-costliest hurricane in U.S. history.

The seasonal hurricane outlook does not predict how many storms will hit land or where a storm will strike.


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