WY expected to avoid record floods

With additional sandbags at the ready, forecasters revise downward predictions of more record flooding in north while watching flooding rivers in the south central part of state.

LANDER, WY | June 17, 2010


Volunteers, emergency responders and members of the Wyoming Army National Guard fill sandbags in Lander to help prevent floodwater damage.
Credit: Fremont County Flood 2010 Incident Command/Michelle Motherway

Emergency responders in northwest Wyoming are taking comfort Thursday from a revised weather forecast that predicts the Little Wind River and the Big Wind River will not rise to record levels. However, in the southern part of the state emergency officials are continuing to deal with flooding along the Laramie River.

Meteorologist Charles Baker said floodwaters will persist through the end of the week in Fremont County, but indicators are not pointing toward the levels county residents battled last week.

“It looks like the worst case is not going to come for us,” Baker said.

Although the water levels may not rise has high as had been predicted, emergency food and the Wyoming National Guard and voluntary organizations are still providing medical services.

Gov. Dave Freudenthal met with members of an evaluation team from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FRMA) Wednesday. The Wyoming governor declared Fremont County as a disaster area after last week's flooding.

Several dozen homes have been damaged in the southern part of the state but extensive sandbagging appears to be paying off in protecting many buildings.

According to a spokesperson for the Bureau of Reclamation in the Wyoming Region, water is going over the spillways on four dams along the North Platte River for the first time since 1984.

Recent flooding in the region has caused some groundwater contamination and health officials are urging residents whose wells were covered by floodwaters to have them tested.

The Popo Agie Conservation District is offering free testing for wells in the region.

One benefit of the flooding may be that it will reduce the number of West Nile virus cases this summer. Many of the breeding pools have washed away and the mosquitoes usually do not breed in the cold snow pack runoff water that has been responsible for this month's flooding.


Related Topics:

Solutions for flood insurance

How US flood insurance works

Volunteers build a Christmas present


More links on Flooding

Advertisers:

DNN Sponsors include:

Advertisements: