Hurricane spares Bermuda

Hurricane Florence spared Bermuda a direct hit on Monday, but still delivered gusting winds and battering waves.

BY SUSAN KIM | BALTIMORE | September 11, 2006


Hurricane Dean as a Category 2 storm before making landfall in Mexico.
Credit: NOAA

Hurricane Florence spared Bermuda a direct hit on Monday, but still delivered gusting winds and battering waves. The island was told to expect 2-4 inches of rain.

The Category 1 storm - with 90-mph winds by Monday afternoon - swept just offshore of Bermuda. There were no immediate reports of injuries or damage.

Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Gordon formed, and continued moving over open waters in the Atlantic northeast of the Leeward Islands. The storm is expected to head east of Bermuda.

Bermuda has practiced disaster mitigation over the last decade. Laws there require newly built houses to withstand sustained winds of 110 mph. Bermuda also installs many of its power and phone lines underground.

Florence was not expected to threaten any U.S. land. The storm could create high surf and rip currents along parts of the U.S. eastern seaboard.

Florence follows Tropical Storm Ernesto, which was briefly the season's first hurricane before weakening and drenching the East Coast last week.

Sept. 10 is the the historical peak of hurricane activity for the Atlantic Basin, which includes the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico. Although so far the U.S. has dodged the most severe damage from hurricanes this year, experts are cautioning that dangerous storms can occur anytime during hurricane season, which stretches from June 1 to November 1. The peak of the season is typically from mid-August to late October.


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