Quake shakes southeast U.S.

A rare 6.0 earthquake rocked the Gulf of Mexico on Sunday, and residents across the southeastern U.S. could feel the temblor, according to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

BY SUSAN KIM | BALTIMORE | September 10, 2006


A rare 6.0 earthquake rocked the Gulf of Mexico on Sunday, and residents across the southeastern U.S. could feel the temblor, according to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

The quake occurred about 6.2 miles below the Gulf surface, and was centered about 260 miles southwest of Tampa. People in Florida, Louisiana, Georgia and Alabama reported that buildings shook for about 20 seconds.

Though no major damage was reported, USGS officials said minor damage was possible. The USGS received almost 2,000 reports from people who could detect the quake. Florida state emergency management also received calls from concerned residents.

It was the largest earthquake in that region reported in 30 years. The quake is unusual because it was not centered on a known fault line. Instead, it is known as a "midplate" earthquake.

There were no reports of damage to oil rigs in the Gulf, and no danger of a tsunami, reported the USGS.


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