Alberto makes landfall

Tropical Storm Alberto weakened to a tropical depression on Wednesday after making landfall near Adams Beach in Florida, bringing 50-mph winds and five inches of rain.

BY SUSAN KIM | BALTIMORE | June 14, 2006


Tropical Storm Alberto weakened to a tropical depression on Wednesday after making landfall near Adams Beach in Florida, bringing 50-mph winds and five inches of rain.

Adams Beach is south of Tallahassee in a sparsely populated area that often floods.

The storm was over South Carolina by early Wednesday morning, and its winds had decreased to 35 mph. North Carolina and southeastern Virginia can expect 2-4 inches of rain. Gale warnings were issued from South Santee River to Currituck Beach, North Carolina.

Minor damage was reported from Tampa Bay to the Panhandle, including street flooding and downed tree limbs. Some homes and businesses had flooding in Levy County, and street flooding was reported in Dixie County. About 300 people stayed in shelters. Power was quickly being restored by Wednesday morning.

Members of the Florida Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster met via conference call on Tuesday afternoon, and no major damage was reported by those organizations, although the rest of the damage was going to be assessed after high tide.

More than 20,000 people along Florida's Gulf Coast were told to evacuate as the storm edged toward the state.

Evacuation orders were posted for people in mobile homes or low-lying areas in five coastal counties but most of the evacuations centered around Citrus, Levy and Taylor counties. Statewide, 26 shelters in 16 counties opened for evacuees.

Rain is good news, at least from the perspective of firefighters who have been battling wildfires for six weeks on Florida's Atlantic coast. Large stretches of Florida, from Fort Lauderdale to the Panhandle, are 50 percent below normal rainfall, according to reports from the National Weather Service.

Alberto drenched Cuba's Pinar del Rio province and Havana throughout the weekend, but caused only minor street flooding, according to government reports.

Scientists have predicted the 2006 season could produce as many as 16 named storms, six of them major hurricanes.


Related Topics:

Atlantic storm morphs into Javier

Florida prepares for TS Colin

More hurricanes predicted in '16


More links on Tropical Storms

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