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Hurricane season stays active

The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season remains busy as two storms churned in the ocean Tuesday.

BY HEATHER MOYER | BALTIMORE | August 9, 2005


"Everywhere I went in Florida last year, I heard the same thing: people who had a hurricane plan did better than those without a hurricane plan."

—Max Mayfield, National Hurricane Center


The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season remains busy as two storms churned in the ocean Tuesday.

As Tropical Storm Harvey pushed further out into the central Atlantic, Tropical Storm Irene was downgraded to a tropical depression. Harvey moved over Bermuda last week but is not expected to impact any more land as it continues its trek.

The predicted track for Irene from the National Hurricane Center (NHC) shows it west of Bermuda and the U.S. East Coast by Saturday. The depression has maximum winds of 20-miles per hour.

Forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are saying the 2005 Hurricane Season may become one of the most active Atlantic hurricane seasons on record.

Brig. Gen. David L. Johnson, director of NOAA's National Weather Service raised that possibility Tuesday while announcing the predicted number of tropical storms has been increased to 18 to 21 named storms.

That number includes the seven already named storms that moved through the Atlantic so far this season and far exceeds the original prediction of 12 to 15 named storms. The new prediction calls for nine to 11 of the named storms becoming hurricanes, and then five to seven of those hurricanes being major. The previous prediction called for seven to nine hurricanes with three to five of them being major.

"The tropics are only going to get busier as we enter the peak of the season," said Johnson. "This may well be one of the most active Atlantic hurricane seasons on record, and will be the ninth above-normal Atlantic hurricane season in the last eleven years."

The seven named storms in June and July already set a record, and meteorologists point to low wind shear and warmer-than-usual sea surface temperatures across the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea as the main cause of the active hurricane seasons of the past decade.

No matter how many storms are predicted for the season, officials from NOAA and the National Hurricane Center urge the public to be prepared.

"Everywhere I went in Florida last year, I heard the same thing: people who had a hurricane plan did better than those without a hurricane plan," said Max Mayfield, director of the NHC. "So why would someone want to wait until the last minute to plan?"

NOAA updates its prediction in early August each year. Hurricane season lasts from June 1 through November 30.


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