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Floods damage ND crops

In the wake of storms that trounced North Dakota, early assessments show ruined crops are a more serious concern than residential damage, said emergency management officials.

BY SUSAN KIM | BALTIMORE | June 10, 2005

In the wake of storms that trounced North Dakota, early assessments show ruined crops are a more serious concern than residential damage, said emergency management officials.

Rick Robinson, spokesperson for the North Dakota Division of Emergency Management, said less than 10 homes were destroyed statewide by recent storms. But, he added, agricultural damage was significant.

In Logan County, storms prevented producers from planting 500 acres of sunflowers and 2,500 acres of soybeans. In the southwestern part of the county, agriculture officials estimate hail caused a 60 percent loss of small grains, a 40 percent loss of corn, sunflowers, soybeans and alfalfa, and a 30 percent loss of mixed forage.

In Pembina County, 20 percent of county cropland is not planted and 100 percent is affected by moisture.

North Dakota Gov. John Hoeven issued a statewide emergency declaration on Thursday for damages resulting from severe thunderstorms that have caused overland flooding, forced evacuations, isolated rural residents and damaged homes and infrastructure. Also included in the declaration is the Devils Lake Basin where flood-related problems have persisted for 12 consecutive years as water levels continue their historic rise.

Flooding was occurring on the Red River at Wahpeton, and flood warnings were in effect along sections of the Buffalo River and the Two Rivers River. Residential assessments were ongoing. Early reports indicate at least 50 homes were damaged in Northwood City.

Forecasters had predicted ongoing significant rain in the area but were able to revise their predictions to indicate only light rainfall would affect the region.

Other midwestern states have seen recent storm damage as well. In South Dakota, five tornadoes have hit the northeast section of the state over the past days, causing widespread pockets of damage.

In Oklahoma, storms dumped heavy rain and hail in the western part of the state and the panhandle.

In Minnesota, more than 200,000 customers lost power in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area due to the storms. Most of these customers have now had power restored.

The National Weather Service reported that localized flooding was continuing in areas from Montana eastward to Illinois. Storm damage due to heavy rains and high wind was also reported in Kansas and Missouri.


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