Disaster News Network Print This
 

Storms pound West

As the powerful storm system that slammed the west moves eastward, communities are cleaning up and Midwestern towns are bracing for the worst.

BY HEATHER MOYER | BALTIMORE | January 13, 2005


"We don't have an accurate count yet, but we know they lost a considerable amount of homes."

—Mike Browning


As the powerful storm system that slammed the west moves eastward, communities are cleaning up and Midwestern towns are bracing for the worst.

In Utah, Washington County is drying out after the Virgin and Santa Clara Rivers devastated numerous towns. The town of Santa Clara saw at least three homes destroyed by floodwaters, and as many as 25 homes were destroyed in the nearby towns of St. George, Washington, Brookside, and Enterprise. The town of Dunlop is still without power and water at this point, said Washington County Sheriff Kirk Smith.

"Right now we're in the damage assessment and cleanup mode. We need to see what the extent of the damage is and see which roads and bridges are unsafe," explained Smith.

The rivers reached historic highs earlier this week as the heavy rains and snow melting mountain snow-pack forced the tributaries from their banks.

The Virgin River also hit several eastern Nevada communities very hard. According to a Nevada Department of Public Safety (NDPS) spokesperson, more than 150 homes in Overton are affected by the high water.

The NDPS is also reporting that more than 600 of families have been evacuated due to high water around Lincoln County, Nevada. The town of Caliente is reporting multiple homes with water damage. Another 66 homes in the Kyle Canyon area are threatened by high water now as well.

Beaver Dam and Littlefield, Ariz., saw significant flooding from the Virgin River as well. "We don't have an accurate count yet, but we know they lost a considerable amount of homes," said Mike Browning, a spokesperson for the Mohave County Emergency Operations Center. "We're estimating at least 20 to 30 homes with significant damage, and another 20 with minor to moderate damage."

Because the two towns are in such remote areas of northwestern Ariz., Browning added that getting assistance to them has been a challenge. The Beaver Dam Fire Chief said that the high water washed out a number of roads and bridges that connect the town to local interstates.

"We're having significant access problems right now," said Gary McIff, the fire chief. "We have to travel on a dirt road for about 10 miles due to all the access road wash-outs. It's the only way in and out of town right now."

McIff said four homes in the small community of 2,500 have been destroyed thus far, but they are still assessing the situation after one of the worst floods the area has seen. He noted that the American Red Cross is in town helping the displaced families.

The same storm system is now terrorizing the Midwest, prompting blizzard warnings in North Dakota, spawning a violent storm that killed two in southern Arkansas, and producing ice across Kansas.

Tornado and severe thunderstorm warnings are popping all across the south now as the storm continues its march east. The system will also bring nothing positive to the already soggy states of Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio. All three states have suffered from deadly and devastating floods during the past two weeks.


Related Topics:

Solutions for flood insurance

How US flood insurance works

Volunteers build a Christmas present


More links on Flooding

Find this article at:

http://www.disasternews.net/news/article.php?articleid=2048

Advertisers:

DNN Sponsors include:

Advertisements: