Tornadoes hit south

Tornadoes and flooding hit rural towns in Georgia and Alabama as the remnants of Tropical Storm Bill moved northeast.

BY TRAVIS DUNN | BALTIMORE | July 2, 2003



"We don't know if we had two tornadoes touch down or if one tornado touched down twice."

—Gene McDaniel


Tornadoes and flooding hit rural towns in Georgia and Alabama as the remnants of Tropical Storm Bill moved northeast.

Hardest hit was the small town of Clito, Ga., in Bulloch County, about 50 miles northwest of Savannah. At least five homes there were destroyed by a possible tornado, and another four homes incurred severe damage, said Lisa Ray, spokeswoman for the Georgia Emergency Management Agency. Six people were also injured and treated at the scene, and the American Red Cross sheltered about 20 people at local motels.

Several homes were also damaged in the town of Register in southern Bulloch County, said Gene McDaniel, Chief Deputy of the Bulloch County Sheriff's Office.

"We don't know if we had two tornadoes touch down or if one tornado touched down twice," said McDaniel. These two twisters touched down after 10:30 Tuesday night, he said.

Just north of Bulloch County, there were reports of lesser damage in Screven County, which also may have been caused by tornadoes.

Meanwhile, another possible tornado damaged two homes in nearby Emanuel County and knocked down trees and power lines, according to Ray.

Sporadic flooding in low-lying areas was reported around the state, Ray said, but there have been no formal requests for state assistance. "We were pretty fortunate," she said.

Teams from the National Weather Service were investigating the storm damage Wednesday, said NWS meteorologist Stephanie Fauver in Charleston, S.C.

Alabama also incurred wind damage, which may have been caused by a tornado, said Scott Adcock, spokesman for the Alabama Emergency Management Agency. Four homes were destroyed in the town of Honoraville, in Crenshaw County, and several more homes were damaged, he said. No injuries were reported.

Trees and power lines were also felled in Montgomery and Mobile counties, he said, and low-lying areas were experiencing minor flooding.

"The ground was already saturated and the water table was high," Adcock said. "Fortunately (Bill) was a rapidly-moving system, which was a good thing for Alabama."


Related Topics:

Wicked weather hits NE Texas

Tornado hits Michigan town

Tornadoes tear through Illinois and Midwest


More links on Tornadoes

Advertisers:

DNN Sponsors include:

Advertisements: